In any business, the most sought after demographic is the 20’s to 40’s spenders with disposable income, a voice in the wider culture, and influence. They are hard to get because there is just so much out there to entice them. They are the demographic worth fighting for.


A large “mini-demographic” within this larger space is the college senior. The college senior is in a weird state of transition because they may be exiting one adult world and entering another entirely different one. The factor of influence and a voice in the culture is true, if “disposable income” is not. This is why many brands offer ways for seniors to save that go beyond the extra 10% allotted to them. This is a practice of going above and beyond to reach a demographic. It is also a process of allowing student discounts to really push a brand forward. Thankfully, the students are the winners.

What students will find most prevalent in ways to save is discounting at retail. Yes, online shopping is growing every year. Yes, Amazon is the kingpin of this push. But, Amazon has some rather steady savings. They don’t often change. It is in the retail space where retailers are really looking to keep their foothold. They know they need to reach this sought-after demographic because it may mean more than highlighting modest annual sales or status quo. It may mean driving forth with a new upswing in business.

Aerie is one of the best brands right now. They used non-Photoshopped models. They make their fabrics close and promote feminine ideals and self-empowerment with every sale (literally- they donate proceeds and a percent of sales to female-fronted organizations). They also offer great savings for students. It just makes sense.

Some of the best places to find savings in retail are in the small brands. These indie brands are trying to build a brand and do good, as opposed to keep their marketshare and support investors. Indie brands do a bit of this, of course, but it is more authentic. This is something students tend to care about as they transition out of college and into a more formal “adulthood.”